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5 Ways to Connect Legos and Literature

What do you do when spring is shining and the kids are squirming?

If you have a child who is enthusiastic about Legos,

enrich their time with a little literary creativity! 

Here are five suggestions: L.E.G.O.S.

weiss bowditch1. Listen to audiobooks while they create.

 

j, w and sauron2. Encourage illustration and narration.

  • Encourage them to build an illustration from a favorite book out of Legos, like this one of Sauron from Lord of the Rings (Thanks, James and William!)
  • Teachers and homeschoolers—could you offer this option instead of a book report next year?!

 

51mhDuSEwVL._SY396_BO1,204,203,200_3. Go to the library or bookstore.

  • Look in the Juv 688.7 section. (We like Totally Cool Creations by Sean Kenney)
  • Easy readers illustrated with Legos may be shelved by the author. (For a list of titles and where to find them at your library, try a subject search: LEGO toys–Juvenile fiction)
  • Many libraries offer Lego Clubs where kids can play with pieces they don’t have at home.
  • Brick Shakespeare and Brick Fairy Tales are classic literature illustrated with Lego. (Both are intended for ages 9 and up). See also Janie’s review of the Faith Builder’s Bible here.

 

books4. Offer a reading challenge and reward them with Lego.

 

jericho5. Stop-Motion Filmmaking

AND, if your children create any literary Lego scenes, please send a photo and description to
megan (at) redeemedreader.com.
I’d love to compile a page containing photos of ALL your books and bricks creations!

 Want a printable Quick Reference Guide? Here you go!

 

I am indebted to Josh G. for his input when I was planning this post, and for showing me his Lego stop-motion filmmaking efforts, and to my nephews, James B. and William B., for sharing their Sauron creation.

2 Comments

  1. Emily P. says

    I listened to countless audio books (and Adventures in Odyssey episodes) while playing with Legos and Duplos as a child! I remember listening to Where the Red Fern Grows and crying over my blocks during one of the sad parts.

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